Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Sindh calls out army for poll security | Pakistan | DAWN.COM

Sindh calls out army for poll security | Pakistan | DAWN.COM:

'via Blog this'

Katherine Russell, Boston Bombing Suspect's Widow, Wants Tamerlan Tsarnaev's Body Released

Katherine Russell, Boston Bombing Suspect's Widow, Wants Tamerlan Tsarnaev's Body Released:

'via Blog this'

BK soon: NO Action: Star blog attacks religion/ethnic background Another low !!

Thanks Star staff for IGNORING this and letting the 
racist thugs and political enemies enjoy! 

The_Mayor is still there and despite trying many times, finaly 


calling twice I cannot start sub

Gal could not write your offer; I signed for wrong offer as 

NOT user friendly

She cancelled & I cannot do it.

HIRE BETTER programers! 


$12 pm for digital is CRAZY!!      NICK Quidwai

Lazlo_Toth writes:

Dear Ms Cochrane,

Better yet, Ms Cochrane, establish the same rules for on-line electronic commentaries to the Star as you require for your hardcopy editions.

Its not even a half dozen comments in, and the name calling starts again. It was previously referred to here as "draining the swamp", well, the job isn't done.

The problem is, people let their hair down..more than they should here. Comments are made, outlandish claims repeated, name calling happens all the time. The Boards are moderated, but i'd have to say intermittently and decisions as to which stories are commented on are..well, ill-defined at best.

Thing is, people feel anonymity means you can say any fool thing you want and since family, friends, employers won't see them you can really let the bile flow. Its unhealthy and i think possibly prevents wider use of the media. Maybe you should survey your subscriber base...the non-posting ones, to see why they don't engage in discussion opportunities here.

I would have to guess your goal, in part, is to develop a vibrant on-line community here. You will never reach full potential when you allow the bullying that goes on here, indeed you aid and abet the worst in people.

I used to post here, under my real name, but for all these reasons no longer do. I've enjoyed the process, mostly. I'm not ashamed of my opinions, but i grew to dislike the personal invective that went on here.

I'm looking below this box as i type, and there is this option...to allow folks to share comments via Facebook and Yahoo! Does anyone do this? Gawd, i'd bet your most frequent posters would be horrified if that happend, more likely their families and associates would be.

Well, good luck with this...but i think you will fail to reach full potential of the media so long as you allow the abuses to continue.

     


    

Read more:http://www.vcstar.com/news/2013/apr/30/message-our-publisher/#comments#ixzz2RzRW12V8 
vcstar.com 

Iqbal  Quidwai
"Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive." 
Newbury Park CA 91320-1821 USA  I.quidwai at gmail.com 
Cell 805-390-2857 
http://cctoaks-nick.blogspot.com/search/label/Pakistan%20%2F%20World%20%2F%20Islam


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Iqbal Quidwai <i.quidwai@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Apr 29, 2013 at 7:21 PM
Subject: NO Action: Star blog attacks religion/ethnic background Another low !!
To: zestrada@vcstar.com


THE_JUDGE writes:

in response to nickeq:

I blame the moderators for allowing this forum to degenerate. I am known and have a following in T. Oaks. I have taken and still take positions on issues. But this is NO PLACE for personal attacks, especially based on religion, ethnicity or origon. In fact specific laws of slander/libel still apply here and the Star management not taking down these cheap shots becomes implicit in the charges.
+++ Who wants to read these snipes from either side.
There are very few people here and it makes one wonder if this is worth the time.
My goal was & is to change opinions:
Ain't gonna happen here!!

"I, for one, will not miss the right wing's vitriol here. This comment section has become a cesspool reflecting the views of the lowest common denominator. Intelligent debate on legitimate issues has become impossible.

Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2013/apr/2... 
- vcstar.com

"A following" lol, I'm sure the only ones following you are the proper authorities. 
I would love to see your multiple accounts and postings filled with slanderous comments and lies in a court. Saying you are from pakistan and believe in banning alcohol and covering women is nothing you have not said yourself repeatedly.

In addition to calling multiple people by name thieves, crooks, liars, cowards, satanic etc etc. It has been proven you are the dishonest one. You don't run a thing, go sell your office supplies and quit interfering with the adults trying to conduct legal business in this city. Play taliban in your own home, this a free country, you don't get to tell people what to do, nor do you get to use deceit and fraud to accomplish your goals. One person, one voice, one vote nicky, all you had to do was play by the rules. Instead you created fake users, accounts, emails to the city etc etc all in a losing attempt to thrust your extreme views upon us. It pisses me off.



Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2013/apr/28/john-t-moore-star-begins-digital-subscription/?comments_id=857753#ixzz2RuQaDZQn 
- vcstar.com 



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Iqbal Quidwai <i.quidwai@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Apr 29, 2013 at 5:12 PM
Subject: Star blog attacks religion/ethnic background Another low !!
To: J Moore <jmoore@vcstar.com>
Cc: "Macchiarella, Gretchen" <gmacchiarella@vcstar.com>, Tom Kisken <tkisken@venturacountystar.com>, Mike Chopp <michaelchopp@hotmail.com>, Mike Comeaux <mComeaux@vcstar.com>, Rachel Mcgrath M Grath <rachel.vcstar@gmail.com>


This guy or gal made this ID 15 mins after being banned for creating ID just to attack me
It denigrades your paper to post and not remove such cheap. libelous attacks
He/she has given my address within 500 ft What if a nut case came??
Put my last name in posts.
Sure today is last day of freebie? + they remain on site available in search
What good is it to flag!!

Nick Iqbal  Quidwai
"Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive." 
Newbury Park CA 91320-1821 USA  I.quidwai at gmail.com 
Cell 805-390-2857 
http://cctoaks-nick.blogspot.com/search/label/Pakistan%20%2F%20World%20%2F%20Islam


Columbia Economist Dr. Jeffrey Sachs speaks candidly on monetary reform

Determination of Great Imran Khan at May 2, 2010

Determination of Great Imran Khan at May 2, 2010:

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Fw: New Paper Links Food Price Inflation to the Power of “Agro-Trader Nexus”

When Your Boss Steals Your Wages – The Invisible Epidemic

Fw:Brief history of IITs





Begin forwarded message:

> Date: December 6, 2005 7:04:29 PM EST


> Following is the brief history of IIT, which I am copying from the 
> website (http://www.iitkgp.ac.in/institute/history.php ) of IIT 
> Kharagpur (the oldest of IITs). 
>  
> Brief history of the IITs
> ----------------------
>  
> The history of the IIT system dates back to 1946 when a committee was 
> set up by Hon'ble Sir Jogendra Singh, Member of the Viceroy's 
> Executive Council, Department of Education, Health and Agriculture to 
> consider the setting up of Higher Technical Institutions for post war 
> industrial development in India. The 22 member committee headed by Sri 
> N.R.Sarkar, in its report, recommended the establishment of four 
> Higher Technical Institutions in the Eastern, Western, Northern and 
> Southern regions, possibly on the lines of the Massachusetts Institute 
> of Technology, USA, with a number of secondary institutions affiliated 
> to it. The report also urged the speedy establishment of all the four 
> institutions with the ones in the East and the West to be started 
> immediately. The committee also felt that such institutes would not 
> only produce undergraduates but they should be engaged in research, 
> producing research workers and technical teachers as well. The 
> standard of the graduates should be at par with those from first class 
> institutions abroad. They felt that the proportion of undergraduates 
> and postgraduate students should be 2:1.
>
> With the above recommendations of the Sarkar committee in view, the 
> first Indian Institute of Technology was born in May 1950 in Hijli, 
> Kharagpur, in the eastern part of India.
>
> Initially the IIT started functioning from 5, Esplanade East, Calcutta 
> and very soon shifted to Hijli in Sept. 1950. The present name 'Indian 
> Institute of Technology' was adopted before the formal inauguration of 
> the Institute on August 18, 1951, by Maulana Abul Kalam Azad.
>
> IIT Kharagpur started its journey in the old Hijli Detention Camp 
> where some of our great freedom fighters toiled and sacrificed their 
> lives for the independence of our country.
>
> The history of IIT Kharagpur is thus intimately linked with the 
> history of the Hijli Detention Camp. This is possibly one of the very 
> few Institutions all over the world, which started life in a prison 
> house.
>
> Pandit Nehru in his first convocation address in 1956 said "Here in 
> the place of that Hijli Detention Camp stands the fine monument of 
> India, representing India's urges, India's future in the making. This 
> picture seems to me symbolical of the changes that are coming to India 
> ."
>  

Fw: Re: The case that saved Indian democracy





Sent: Saturday, April 27, 2013 12:34 PM
Subject:  The case that saved Indian democracy

 
It is surprising to read that Indira Gandhi was a real dictator who could not twist democracy into dictatorship just by a fluke of fate. If seven judges would have cited her she would have established a family dynasty with Sanjay at its helm. Even after losing out to the court she twisted the law as much as possible.




 

The Hindu

OPINION » OP-ED

April 24, 2013

The case that saved Indian democracy

ARVIND P. DATAR

The judgment in Kesavananda Bharati v State of Kerala, whose 40th anniversary falls today, was crucial in upholding the supremacy of the Constitution and preventing authoritarian rule by a single party

Exactly forty years ago, on April 24, 1973, Chief Justice Sikri and 12 judges of the Supreme Court assembled to deliver the most important judgment in its history. The case of Kesavananda Bharati v State of Kerala had been heard for 68 days, the arguments commencing on October 31, 1972, and ending on March 23, 1973. The hard work and scholarship that had gone into the preparation of this case was breathtaking. Literally hundreds of cases had been cited and the then Attorney-General had made a comparative chart analysing the provisions of the Constitutions of 71 different countries!

CORE QUESTION

All this effort was to answer just one main question: was the power of Parliament to amend the Constitution unlimited? In other words, could Parliament alter, amend, abrogate any part of the Constitution even to the extent of taking away all fundamental rights?
Article 368, on a plain reading, did not contain any limitation on the power of Parliament to amend any part of the Constitution. There was nothing that prevented Parliament from taking away a citizen's right to freedom of speech or his religious freedom. But the repeated amendments made to the Constitution raised a doubt: was there any inherent or implied limitation on the amending power of Parliament?
The 703-page judgment revealed a sharply divided court and, by a wafer-thin majority of 7:6, it was held that Parliament could amend any part of the Constitution so long as it did not alter or amend "the basic structure or essential features of the Constitution." This was the inherent and implied limitation on the amending power of Parliament. This basic structure doctrine, as future events showed, saved Indian democracy and Kesavananda Bharati will always occupy a hallowed place in our constitutional history.

SUPREME COURT V INDIRA GANDHI

It is supremely ironical that the basic structure theory was first introduced by Justice Mudholkar eight years earlier by referring to a 1963 decision of the Supreme Court of Pakistan. Chief Justice Cornelius — yes, Pakistan had a Christian Chief Justice and, later, a Hindu justice as well — had held that the President of Pakistan could not alter the "fundamental features" of their Constitution.
The Kesavananda Bharati case was the culmination of a serious conflict between the judiciary and the government, then headed by Mrs Indira Gandhi. In 1967, the Supreme Court took an extreme view, in the Golak Nath case, that Parliament could not amend or alter any fundamental right. Two years later, Indira Gandhi nationalised 14 major banks and the paltry compensation was made payable in bonds that matured after 10 years! This was struck down by the Supreme Court, although it upheld the right of Parliament to nationalise banks and other industries. A year later, in 1970, Mrs Gandhi abolished the Privy Purses. This was a constitutional betrayal of the solemn assurance given by Sardar Patel to all the erstwhile rulers. This was also struck down by the Supreme Court. Ironically, the abolition of the Privy Purses was challenged by the late Madhavrao Scindia, who later joined the Congress Party.
Smarting under three successive adverse rulings, which had all been argued by N.A. Palkhivala, Indira Gandhi was determined to cut the Supreme Court and the High Courts to size and she introduced a series of constitutional amendments that nullified the Golak NathBank Nationalisation and Privy Purses judgments. In a nutshell, these amendments gave Parliament uncontrolled power to alter or even abolish any fundamental right.
These drastic amendments were challenged by Kesavananda Bharati, the head of a math in Kerala, and several coal, sugar and running companies. On the other side, was not only the Union of India but almost all the States which had also intervened. This case had serious political overtones with several heated exchanges between N.A. Palkhivala for the petitioners and H.M. Seervai and Niren De, who appeared for the State of Kerala and the Union of India respectively.
The infamous Emergency was declared in 1975 and, by then, eight new judges had been appointed to the Supreme Court. A shocking attempt was made by Chief Justice Ray to review the Kesavananda Bharatidecision by constituting another Bench of 13 judges. In what is regarded as the finest advocacy that was heard in the Supreme Court, Palkhivala made an impassioned plea for not disturbing the earlier view. In a major embarrassment to Ray, it was revealed that no one had filed a review petition. How was this Bench then constituted? The other judges strongly opposed this impropriety and the 13-judge Bench was dissolved after two days of arguments. The tragic review was over but it did irreversible damage to the reputation of Chief Justice A.N. Ray.

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS SAVED

If the majority of the Supreme Court had held (as six judges indeed did) that Parliament could alter any part of the Constitution, India would most certainly have degenerated into a totalitarian State or had one-party rule. At any rate, the Constitution would have lost its supremacy. Even Seervai later admitted that the basic structure theory preserved Indian democracy. One has to only examine the amendments that were made during the Emergency. The 39th Amendment prohibited any challenge to the election of the President, Vice-President, Speaker and Prime Minister, irrespective of the electoral malpractice. This was a clear attempt to nullify the adverse Allahabad High Court ruling against Indira Gandhi. The 41st Amendment prohibited any case, civil or criminal, being filed against the President, Vice-President, Prime Minister or the Governors, not only during their term of office but forever. Thus, if a person was a governor for just one day, he acquired immunity from any legal proceedings for life. If Parliament were indeed supreme, these shocking amendments would have become part of the Constitution.
Thanks to Kesavananda Bharati, Palkhivala and the seven judges who were in the majority, India continues to be the world's largest democracy. The souls of Nehru, Patel, Ambedkar and all the founding fathers of our Constitution can really rest in peace.
(Arvind P. Datar is a senior advocate of the Madras High Court.)






Fw: "The Rich Don't Always Win" - But They Usually Do

Cycle of Violence

The US's Narrow-Minded Anti-Terrorism Strategy: Blowback and the Cycle of Violence

Fw: The US Spends Millions To Cover Sexual Assault In The Military





"The Veterans Affairs department spent almost $872 million in 2010 to deal with the health impacts of sexual assaults on former military personnel.
This figure is based on the $10,880 dollars the Veterans Administration spends to treat each sexual assault victim after he or she leaves the service.
The $872 million does not include costs for victims still in the military."



The US Spends Millions To Cover Sexual Assault In The Military








Inland Empire Bond probe + FBI searches Mayor's home

Federal agents search home of Moreno Valley mayor, developer

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Federal agents searched the home of the Moreno Valley mayor and a major warehouse developer Tuesday as part of a investigation into allegations of corruption, authorities said.

Agents with the FBI, Internal Revenue Service and representatives of the Riverside district attorney's office served search warrants at the home of Mayor Tom Owing and the corporate offices of Highland Fairview, the company that has proposed a massive 41-million-square-foot warehouse center on the eastern side of the city.

"These are federal warrants and state warrants,'' said Laura Eimiller, FBI spokeswoman in Los Angeles. "The warrants are under seal, so I cannot comment further on the investigation.''

The investigation is being conducted by a joint corruption task force established in the Inland Empire in 2010 because of widespread allegations of government corruption throughout Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

The investigations by the task force have led to the convictions of the former chairman of the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors as well as the mayor of Upland. Other agencies under investigation include the San Bernardino International Airport Authority and the Inland Valley Development Agency in San Bernardino.

On Monday, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission also accused the city of Victorville and one of its financial advisors of defrauding investors in a $13.3-million bond sale in 2008.

In Moreno Valley, the proposed warehouse center, known as the World Logistics Center, has been embroiled in controversy and faces opposition by nearby residents who fear the project will cause traffic jams and affect air quality.

Iddo Benzeevi, chief executive of Highland Fairview, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. The mayor also was unavailable.

Highland Fairview developed the 1.8-million-square-foot Skechers warehouse along Moreno Valley Freeway, a massive complex that dominates the landscape on the eastern edge of town.

=============================================================================

Ever since the Department of Defense shut down George Air Force Base in 1992, the high desert town of Victorville has struggled to reinvent itself.

The city encouraged massive residential and retail development. It invested in two new power plants. And it moved to transform the shuttered base into a thriving cargo airport.

But those efforts have mostly backfired, creating financial headaches and scandal for the city of 115,000 residents, perched 90 miles from Los Angeles on the edge of the Mojave Desert.

On Monday it got worse. The Securities and Exchange Commission accused the city, a key financial advisor and others of defrauding investors in a $13.3-million bond sale in 2008.

The SEC alleged that Victorville, its Southern California Logistics Airport Authority, an assistant city manager and bond underwriter Kinsell, Newcomb & DeDios Inc. in Carlsbad dramatically overstated the value of airport hangars to raise needed funds through the bond offering.

The suit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, contends that the authority valued the properties at $65 million when the city, the authority and the underwriter knew they were worth less than half that amount. The complaint also alleged that the financial advisors never disclosed that they took $2.75 million in bond proceeds.

The federal agency alleged that the false information made it impossible for potential investors to make informed decisions about the risk of buying the bonds.

"Financing redevelopment projects by selling municipal bonds based on inflated valuations violates the public trust as well as the anti-fraud provisions of the federal securities laws," said George S. Canellos, co-director of the SEC enforcement division.

"Public officials have the same obligation as corporate officials to tell the truth to their investors," he said.

The once fast-growing high desert city and the airport authority plan to "vigorously fight the case," said Terree A. Bowers, a lawyer for Victorville. He dismissed as "technical" much of the fraud allegations.

"These actions are somewhat questionable given the city's emerging recovery from the Great Recession," said Bowers, a former U.S. attorney in Los Angeles. "It is certainly worth debating whether this lawsuit is in anyone's best interest."

The lawsuit comes at a pivotal time for Victorville. The city has been struggling to rebound from the recession and from such self-inflicted wounds as its ill-fated investment in a hybrid gas and solar power plant, defaults on bond payments and even a deficit-ridden municipal golf course.

The latest blow from the SEC, however, could crimp the city's borrowing efforts further, said former Victorville City Council member Terry Caldwell, who left the council in 2010.

"The SEC complaint is a cloud over the city, especially in the bond market if the city wants to sell bonds for future projects," he said.

Caldwell said the airport remains a crucial part of the city's future economic success. The authority has been trying to develop a 132-square-mile area on and around the old George Air Force Base as a logistics airport for cargo traffic and aircraft maintenance and storage.

In addition to the city, the authority and the underwriter, others named as defendants are KND Affiliates; J. Jeffrey Kinsell, president of Kinsell Newcomb; Janees L. Williams, vice president of Kinsell Newcomb; and Keith C. Metzler, assistant city manager of Victorville. KND Holdings Inc., parent company of KND Affiliates, also was named as a relief defendant.

The suit also alleged that KND Affiliates misappropriated bond proceeds it collected as construction and property management fees related to the building of airplane hangars. Kinsell, a half owner, "had no construction experience," the complaint said.

Lawyers for the bond underwriters and Metzler did not return telephone calls.

The crux of the government's allegations centered on the city's use of so-called tax-increment bonds to pay for a variety of developments. The projects included four hangars and a power plant.

Tax-increment bonds are not backed by the general treasury of the issuing government. Instead, they are secured and repaid from increases in property tax revenues that flow from the new value of improvements to the land, structures and real estate market conditions.

In early 2008, the airport authority borrowed $35 million in a private deal with a major bank, which the SEC wouldn't name. Soon after, the authority sold $13.3 million in bonds to pay off part of that debt. That sale was premised on the value of the four hangars, which the city, the authority and the underwriters said was $65 million, according to the SEC suit.

That amount, the SEC alleged, was "vastly inflated." The hangars were worth less than half that amount, roughly $28 million, according to the suit.

What's more, the suit claimed, the defendants "knew that the assessed value of hangars was inflated."

The authority, unable to raise enough money, eventually defaulted twice on its bonds.

Last July, a San Bernardino County grand jury investigation found that the city spent $103 million on the aircraft hangars, but that some $13 million of the funding remained unaccounted for.

Given the state of the city's finances, Victorville Councilwoman Angela Valles, elected in 2010, said she was surprised that the SEC focused solely on the use of bond funds for the airport hangars.

"I was a little shocked," said the outspoken critic of past city handling of financial matters. "That's all they got? There's $13 million missing.... It's weak.''

Still, Valles said she has yet to see concrete evidence of corruption among city officials related to SEC investigation. "Is it incompetence or corruption? I still don't know," she said.

The allegations are the latest in a series of financial calamities that that have plagued the recession-flattened city.

The grand jury found that Victorville officials relied on questionable — possibly illegal — measures for years in a desperate attempt to avoid insolvency. They dipped into sanitation funds to help keep the city's treasury solvent and lent water agency funds to bail out the city's electric utility, the report said.

The grand jury report also blasted the city, whose council members also serve on the authority's board, for diverting $2 million in airport bond funds to buy land for a city library.

"The city's solvency, capacity to provide current services and ability to repay large debt obligations is a growing concern," the grand jury report stated.

The airport authority was created to re-purpose the former military base for civilian use and serve as an economic driver for development in the high desert. The base closure eliminated about 5,000 military and 700 civilian jobs, a blow from which Victorville never fully recovered.

The city's financial problems were exacerbated by the multimillion-dollar loss on a proposed hybrid gas and solar power plant near the airport. The 500-megawatt power plant was initiated and funded by the airport authority's board.

The grand jury criticized the authority for failing to "conduct proper due diligence" before hiring Inland Energy Inc. in Newport Beach to oversee the development of the site.

Inland Energy also recommended that the city enter into a $182-million contract in 2007 withGeneral Electric Co. to buy turbines for the plant. The bond issue at the heart of the SEC case was aimed at helping to make a down payment on the turbines.

Unable to secure the rest of the financing, Victorville was forced to pay GE $50 million to settle the resulting contract dispute.

marc.lifsher@latimes.com

phil.willon@latimes.com

ken.bensinger@latimes.com

N  Quidwai
"Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive." 
Newbury Park CA 91320-1821 USA  I.quidwai at gmail.com 
 
http://cctoaks-nick.blogspot.com/search/label/Pakistan%20%2F%20World%20%2F%20Islam